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New UK Import Regulations for Carriers to Come into Force on 31st January 2024

TSLNew UK Import Regulations for Carriers to Come into Force on 31st January 2024

Polish carriers who transport goods to the United Kingdom must prepare for additional changes. Starting from the 31st of January, the UK will require certificates, also known as Export Health Certificates (EHC). The new regulations mainly apply to animal-origin products, but also to plants, fruits and vegetables.

Key points to note include:

  • The UK is introducing new regulations – importing certain products will require the submission of relevant certificates.
  • Physical and documentation controls of sanitary and phytosanitary goods are to be introduced on the 30th of April 2024.
  • Carriers must be prepared for additional controls at the border.

The UK has already postponed the certification of food imported from the EU multiple times. It is now known that from the 31st of January, the importation of certain products from the EU, other EEA countries (Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway) and the Faroe Islands, Greenland and Switzerland to the UK can continue, provided certain conditions are met. These conditions include having the relevant certificates, namely the Export Health Certificate (EHC).

“Brexit has complicated the process of transporting goods, which is why it’s important to stay up to date with any changes in British law that could affect exporters and importers from the EU, including Poland. The current certification is the first step, the next will be the physical inspections of food imported to the UK, which will result in additional time spent at the border,” says Joanna Porath, owner of the customs agency AC Porath, which specialises in servicing the UK market.

Health certificates required

The most significant changes apply to products of animal origin. Health certificates will be needed for meat products and all products made from raw milk.

“The UK’s revised control measures for importing goods of animal and plant origin assume that all meat and dairy products will require prior notification, except for dairy products that have been heat-treated. They will not require a health certificate. The rules mandating that imported animals and plants for planting always require health certificates and are subject to inspection still apply,” informs Steve Cock, Director of Customs Consultancy The Custom House Ltd.

As far as fruits and vegetables from the EU are concerned, controls will be based on the risk assigned to the goods, which can be low, medium or high. For most cases, they will not need to undergo British commercial standards or plant health controls. However, the UK government encourages carriers to check which imported goods will be subject to control. Detailed lists can be found on these pages:

Risk categorisation for plants and plant products from the European Union: https://planthealthportal.defra.gov.uk/trade/imports/target-operating-model-tom/tom-risk-categorisations

For other goods:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/risk-categories-for-animal-and-animal-product-imports-to-great-britain/target-operating-model-tom-risk-categories-for-animal-and-animal-product-imports-from-the-eu-to-great-britain.

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